MSc Exercise and Nutrition Science

Delivered in Dublin. Awarded by University of Chester.

This part-time Master’s course is designed for those who wish to extend their knowledge, qualifications and expertise in this popular area of study. Our course aims to provide postgraduate education and training opportunities for exercise, nutrition and health professionals, and provide opportunities for those aspiring to work in this high-profile field.

Course Content

The MSc in Exercise and Nutrition Science will enable you to develop a critical knowledge and understanding of fundamental and contemporary issues in relation to physical activity and health and nutrition in health and disease, as well as applying these principles to sporting populations.

info
Overview

This course aims to provide postgraduate education and training opportunities for exercise, nutrition and health professionals, and provide opportunities for those aspiring to work in this high-profile field.

The aims of this postgraduate course are for you to develop:

  • a critical understanding of the concepts and controversies in exercise and nutrition science
  • a scientific and enquiring approach to the study of contemporary exercise and nutrition issues
  • research skills for the critical investigation of exercise and nutrition topics

The course is highly flexible, allowing you to study part time to suit your personal and work commitments. Flexibility is achieved through the delivery of modules over three-day blocks followed by eight weeks of home-based learning. This allows students nationally and internationally to attend the course.

The course is delivered by a team of experienced academics and also practitioners who work in high-profile areas.

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Careers

As a qualified sport and exercise nutritionist you will able to pursue employment in a range of different areas including the sports and fitness industry, public health nutrition and academia (taught and/or research). You will also be able to apply for Graduate Registration on the Sport and Exercise Nutrition Register as a stepping stone to becoming a Registered Sports Nutritionist.

The University has an award winning Careers and Employability service which provides a variety of employability-enhancing experiences; through the curriculum; through employer contact and through tailored group sessions and individual information, advice and guidance.

Careers and Employability aims to deliver a service which is inclusive, impartial, welcoming, informed and tailored to your personal goals and aspirations, to enable you to develop as an individual and contribute to the business and community in which you will live and work.

We are here to help you plan your future and to enhance your employability. We provide access to part-time jobs and work shadowing. We offer practical one-to-one help with career planning including help with CVs, applications and mock interviews. We deliver group sessions on career planning within each taught programme. We have extensive information on graduate jobs and postgraduate study.

Students and graduates of the University of Chester can use our services free of charge for up to three years after graduating. Graduates of other UK universities within three years of graduation are also welcome to use our services during vacations. A charging policy applies to other clients.

euro_symbol
Fees

2018/19 full course fee: £7, 830

The University may increase these fees at the start of each subsequent year of your course in line with inflation at that time, as measured by the Retail Price Index. These fee levels and increases are subject to any necessary government, and other regulatory, approvals.

Your course will involve additional costs not covered by your tuition fees. This may include books, printing, photocopying, educational stationery and related materials, specialist clothing, travel to placements, optional field trips and software. Compulsory field trips are covered by your tuition fees.

If you are living away from home during your time at University, you will need to cover costs such as accommodation, food, travel and bills.

group
Eligibility

The course is open to applicants with a minimum of a 2:2 honours degree in a related subject area, or equivalent professional qualifications.

Consideration will also be given to applicants with relevant work experience, background knowledge and skills.

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Syllabus
Modules

The modules aim to enable you to develop a critical knowledge and understanding of fundamental and contemporary issues in relation to physical activity and health and nutrition in health and disease, as well as applying these principles to sporting populations. A variety of module options means the course can be tailored to suit your needs.

Physiology & Physical Performance (Optional) (XN7501)

  1. Homeostasis: rest, exercise and recovery integrative responses and control mechanisms.
  2. Physiology of anaerobic and aerobic metabolism: energy substrate utilisation; neurohormonal control mechanisms; thermoregulation mechanisms and fluid balance.
  3. Physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and neuromuscular systems during exercise.
  4. Maximum oxygen uptake: measurement and evaluation; physiological limits to maximal aerobic performance.
  5. Relationships between workload and HR/BP/VO2/VCO2/VE
  6. Resting and exercise ECG assessment and interpretation.

Physiology & Biochemistry of Metabolism (Optional) (XN7502)

  1. Metabolic overview: metabolic requirements of tissues – liver, muscle, heart and brain; bioenergetics and energy transduction in cells; role of creatine phosphate; energy sources and pathways
  2. Carbohydrate metabolism – glucose and glycogen; glycolysis, glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis; TCA cycle; substrate and oxidative phosphorylation
  3. Dietary lipids – saturated, unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats; essential fatty acids; cholesterol. Lipid metabolism – triglyceride and ketone body metabolism; phospholipid and cholesterol; adipose tissue metabolism; lipoproteins –role and turnover; lipids and health.
  4. Protein metabolism – amino acid catabolism and waste nitrogen; nutrition and protein metabolism; regulation systems. Metabolic control of lipids and carbohydrates – glucagon and insulin; metabolism in exercise and starvation.

Science of Weight Control (Optional) (XN7506)

  1. Physiological & biochemical principles of energy inputs and outputs.
  2. Measurement of energy inputs; the value and validity of such measurements; use of food tables; valid approximations.
  3. Biochemical and physiological basis of human metabolism and metabolic rate. Measurement of energy expenditure.
  4. Energy balance and the control of body weight.
  5. Definitions and measurement of body composition.
  6. Obesity, causes, problems and treatments (surgery, drugs, diets and lifestyle).
  7. Eating disorders: starvation, bulimia, anorexia nervosa.
  8. Exercise and weight control.
  9. Weight control in sport: body builders, boxers, jockeys, gymnastics
  10. Control systems involved in regulation of food intake; genetic and psychological aspects; drug treatments

Nutrition in Health and Disease (Optional) (XN7509)

  1. Nutrition and health including review of the principal nutrients.
  2. Nutrition needs of different groups including eating behaviour and food choice.
  3. Healthy eating recommendations for the general public.
  4. Malnutrition: including protein, energy and micronutrient deficiencies.
  5. Dietary factors in causation and prevention of chronic diseases.
  6. Nutritional epidemiology and public health.
  7. Role of scientific advisory committees and regulatory agencies.
  8. Emerging concerns in nutrition and health.

Research Methods and Data Analysis (Compulsory) (XN7512)

  1. The building blocks of scientific research: types of research (analytical, descriptive, experimental, and qualitative), scientific parlance (hypothesis, concepts, operational definitions, and dependent/independent variables), sampling procedures, and measurement issues (reliability and validity).
  2. Research and data collection methods: experimental research (developing hypotheses, independent/dependent variables, controls, sample selection, study designs, and experimental validity); descriptive research (questionnaires and interviews, case studies); qualitative research (characteristics, procedures, methods of data collection, data analysis, and internal/external validity).
  3. Typical research of relevance to the discipline.
  4. The nature of research; scientific methods of enquiry, pure versus applied ways of problem solving. Developing the research problem; identifying a topic area, devising specific questions, discovering what is already known (reviewing the literature), determining feasible ways to answer the questions.
  5. Ethics in research.
  6. Introduction to data analysis software (SPSS for Windows). Establishing an SPSS database. Defining and transforming variables; data storage and retrieval.
  7. Data analysis for descriptive and experimental research; descriptive statistics. Describing data; measures of variability, correlation and scatter plots. inferential statistics. Selecting an appropriate statistical test (parametric or non-parametric), and types of statistical tests (chi-square; t-tests; one-way ANOVA & post-hoc tests; Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney U). Worked examples in SPSS
  8. Additional statistics; Repeated Measures ANOVA; Factorial ANOVA, Limits of agreement analysis for method comparison and test retest reliability. Worked examples in SPSS.

Sports Nutrition (Optional) (XN7514)

  1. Energy for exercise: an overview of energy systems and fuels
  2. High intensity versus low intensity exercise.
  3. Review of literature related to the role of carbohydrate, fat and protein during different exercise intensities.
  4. Fluid balance: related research.
  5. Nutritional ergogenic aids.
  6. Sports nutrition in practice: working with elite and club level athletes.
  7. Methods of dietary analysis in research and field situations
  8. Professional and ethical issues in Sports Nutrition
  9. Determinants of eating behaviour; related research.

Exercise and Health (Optional) (XN7515)

  1. Exercise, fitness and health; physiology of exercise; overview of exercise in prevention and treatment
  2. Exercise in cardiovascular health and disease; metabolic syndrome, diabetes management, etc.
  3. Exercise and the immune system, cancer, bone health & stress management
  4. Assessment of health-related fitness: strength, body fat%, flexibility, aerobic capacity
  5. Exercise prescription – principles & practices
  6. Exercise in occupational and community health & fitness

Independent Study (Exercise Science) (Optional) (XN7521)

The module will focus on individual student research into the agreed exercise-related topic.

Independent Study (Nutrition) (Optional) (XN7522)

The module will focus on individual student research into the agreed nutrition-related topic.

Research Project (Compulsory) (XN7523)

The research will be agreed with an appropriate supervisor and the Research Co-ordinator. The subject matter must be related to exercise and nutrition science.

The modules given above are the latest example of the curriculum available on this degree programme. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to change from time to time for reasons which include curriculum enhancement, staff changes, student numbers, improvements in technology, changes to placements or regulatory or external body requirements.

OVERVIEW

This course aims to provide postgraduate education and training opportunities for exercise, nutrition and health professionals, and provide opportunities for those aspiring to work in this high-profile field.

The aims of this postgraduate course are for you to develop:

  • a critical understanding of the concepts and controversies in exercise and nutrition science
  • a scientific and enquiring approach to the study of contemporary exercise and nutrition issues
  • research skills for the critical investigation of exercise and nutrition topics

The course is highly flexible, allowing you to study part time to suit your personal and work commitments. Flexibility is achieved through the delivery of modules over three-day blocks followed by eight weeks of home-based learning. This allows students nationally and internationally to attend the course.

The course is delivered by a team of experienced academics and also practitioners who work in high-profile areas.

CAREERS

As a qualified sport and exercise nutritionist you will able to pursue employment in a range of different areas including the sports and fitness industry, public health nutrition and academia (taught and/or research). You will also be able to apply for Graduate Registration on the Sport and Exercise Nutrition Register as a stepping stone to becoming a Registered Sports Nutritionist.

The University has an award winning Careers and Employability service which provides a variety of employability-enhancing experiences; through the curriculum; through employer contact and through tailored group sessions and individual information, advice and guidance.

Careers and Employability aims to deliver a service which is inclusive, impartial, welcoming, informed and tailored to your personal goals and aspirations, to enable you to develop as an individual and contribute to the business and community in which you will live and work.

We are here to help you plan your future and to enhance your employability. We provide access to part-time jobs and work shadowing. We offer practical one-to-one help with career planning including help with CVs, applications and mock interviews. We deliver group sessions on career planning within each taught programme. We have extensive information on graduate jobs and postgraduate study.

Students and graduates of the University of Chester can use our services free of charge for up to three years after graduating. Graduates of other UK universities within three years of graduation are also welcome to use our services during vacations. A charging policy applies to other clients.

FEES

2018/19 full course fee: £7, 830

The University may increase these fees at the start of each subsequent year of your course in line with inflation at that time, as measured by the Retail Price Index. These fee levels and increases are subject to any necessary government, and other regulatory, approvals.

Your course will involve additional costs not covered by your tuition fees. This may include books, printing, photocopying, educational stationery and related materials, specialist clothing, travel to placements, optional field trips and software. Compulsory field trips are covered by your tuition fees.

If you are living away from home during your time at University, you will need to cover costs such as accommodation, food, travel and bills.

ELIGIBILITY

The course is open to applicants with a minimum of a 2:2 honours degree in a related subject area, or equivalent professional qualifications.

Consideration will also be given to applicants with relevant work experience, background knowledge and skills.

SYLLABUS

Modules

The modules aim to enable you to develop a critical knowledge and understanding of fundamental and contemporary issues in relation to physical activity and health and nutrition in health and disease, as well as applying these principles to sporting populations. A variety of module options means the course can be tailored to suit your needs.

Physiology & Physical Performance (Optional) (XN7501)

  1. Homeostasis: rest, exercise and recovery integrative responses and control mechanisms.
  2. Physiology of anaerobic and aerobic metabolism: energy substrate utilisation; neurohormonal control mechanisms; thermoregulation mechanisms and fluid balance.
  3. Physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and neuromuscular systems during exercise.
  4. Maximum oxygen uptake: measurement and evaluation; physiological limits to maximal aerobic performance.
  5. Relationships between workload and HR/BP/VO2/VCO2/VE
  6. Resting and exercise ECG assessment and interpretation.

Physiology & Biochemistry of Metabolism (Optional) (XN7502)

  1. Metabolic overview: metabolic requirements of tissues – liver, muscle, heart and brain; bioenergetics and energy transduction in cells; role of creatine phosphate; energy sources and pathways
  2. Carbohydrate metabolism – glucose and glycogen; glycolysis, glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis; TCA cycle; substrate and oxidative phosphorylation
  3. Dietary lipids – saturated, unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats; essential fatty acids; cholesterol. Lipid metabolism – triglyceride and ketone body metabolism; phospholipid and cholesterol; adipose tissue metabolism; lipoproteins –role and turnover; lipids and health.
  4. Protein metabolism – amino acid catabolism and waste nitrogen; nutrition and protein metabolism; regulation systems. Metabolic control of lipids and carbohydrates – glucagon and insulin; metabolism in exercise and starvation.

Science of Weight Control (Optional) (XN7506)

  1. Physiological & biochemical principles of energy inputs and outputs.
  2. Measurement of energy inputs; the value and validity of such measurements; use of food tables; valid approximations.
  3. Biochemical and physiological basis of human metabolism and metabolic rate. Measurement of energy expenditure.
  4. Energy balance and the control of body weight.
  5. Definitions and measurement of body composition.
  6. Obesity, causes, problems and treatments (surgery, drugs, diets and lifestyle).
  7. Eating disorders: starvation, bulimia, anorexia nervosa.
  8. Exercise and weight control.
  9. Weight control in sport: body builders, boxers, jockeys, gymnastics
  10. Control systems involved in regulation of food intake; genetic and psychological aspects; drug treatments

Nutrition in Health and Disease (Optional) (XN7509)

  1. Nutrition and health including review of the principal nutrients.
  2. Nutrition needs of different groups including eating behaviour and food choice.
  3. Healthy eating recommendations for the general public.
  4. Malnutrition: including protein, energy and micronutrient deficiencies.
  5. Dietary factors in causation and prevention of chronic diseases.
  6. Nutritional epidemiology and public health.
  7. Role of scientific advisory committees and regulatory agencies.
  8. Emerging concerns in nutrition and health.

Research Methods and Data Analysis (Compulsory) (XN7512)

  1. The building blocks of scientific research: types of research (analytical, descriptive, experimental, and qualitative), scientific parlance (hypothesis, concepts, operational definitions, and dependent/independent variables), sampling procedures, and measurement issues (reliability and validity).
  2. Research and data collection methods: experimental research (developing hypotheses, independent/dependent variables, controls, sample selection, study designs, and experimental validity); descriptive research (questionnaires and interviews, case studies); qualitative research (characteristics, procedures, methods of data collection, data analysis, and internal/external validity).
  3. Typical research of relevance to the discipline.
  4. The nature of research; scientific methods of enquiry, pure versus applied ways of problem solving. Developing the research problem; identifying a topic area, devising specific questions, discovering what is already known (reviewing the literature), determining feasible ways to answer the questions.
  5. Ethics in research.
  6. Introduction to data analysis software (SPSS for Windows). Establishing an SPSS database. Defining and transforming variables; data storage and retrieval.
  7. Data analysis for descriptive and experimental research; descriptive statistics. Describing data; measures of variability, correlation and scatter plots. inferential statistics. Selecting an appropriate statistical test (parametric or non-parametric), and types of statistical tests (chi-square; t-tests; one-way ANOVA & post-hoc tests; Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney U). Worked examples in SPSS
  8. Additional statistics; Repeated Measures ANOVA; Factorial ANOVA, Limits of agreement analysis for method comparison and test retest reliability. Worked examples in SPSS.

Sports Nutrition (Optional) (XN7514)

  1. Energy for exercise: an overview of energy systems and fuels
  2. High intensity versus low intensity exercise.
  3. Review of literature related to the role of carbohydrate, fat and protein during different exercise intensities.
  4. Fluid balance: related research.
  5. Nutritional ergogenic aids.
  6. Sports nutrition in practice: working with elite and club level athletes.
  7. Methods of dietary analysis in research and field situations
  8. Professional and ethical issues in Sports Nutrition
  9. Determinants of eating behaviour; related research.

Exercise and Health (Optional) (XN7515)

  1. Exercise, fitness and health; physiology of exercise; overview of exercise in prevention and treatment
  2. Exercise in cardiovascular health and disease; metabolic syndrome, diabetes management, etc.
  3. Exercise and the immune system, cancer, bone health & stress management
  4. Assessment of health-related fitness: strength, body fat%, flexibility, aerobic capacity
  5. Exercise prescription – principles & practices
  6. Exercise in occupational and community health & fitness

Independent Study (Exercise Science) (Optional) (XN7521)

The module will focus on individual student research into the agreed exercise-related topic.

Independent Study (Nutrition) (Optional) (XN7522)

The module will focus on individual student research into the agreed nutrition-related topic.

Research Project (Compulsory) (XN7523)

The research will be agreed with an appropriate supervisor and the Research Co-ordinator. The subject matter must be related to exercise and nutrition science.

The modules given above are the latest example of the curriculum available on this degree programme. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to change from time to time for reasons which include curriculum enhancement, staff changes, student numbers, improvements in technology, changes to placements or regulatory or external body requirements.

Schedule and Location

This course is available part-time as three or four day weekends in Dublin at the National Training Centre in Dublin’s city centre.

DUBLIN
Weekend Course - 2 to 4 years
Thursday to Sunday - 9am to 5pm
(Some weekends are Friday to Sunday - 9am to 5pm)

  Location: NTC, Dublin
  Start Date: September 2019
  Awarded By: University of Chester
  Availability: Good

MSc Team

University of Chester staff from the Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition deliver this programme.

MSc Programme Leader

Dr. Ceri Nicholas

After completing her PhD on nutritional interventions in high intensity intermittent exercise, Dr. Nicholas began her teaching career as a lecturer in Sports Science at the University of Wales Institute Cardiff. In 1996, she returned to Loughborough University as a Research Fellow in the Department of Physical Education and Sports Science before moving to the University of Essex to take up the post of Teaching Fellow in the Department of Biological Sciences in 2003.

In 2006, Dr Nicholas joined the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences at the University of Chester as a Senior Lecturer and moved to the Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition in 2012. Within the Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition, Dr Nicholas’ teaching focuses on Exercise Physiology and Sports Nutrition.

Dr Nicholas is the progrmme leader and she also manages the research phase of the MSc in Exercise and Nutrition Science programme.

Dr Nicholas is the Department’s disability support, equality and diversity officer and is also a member of the Faculty’s Research Ethics Committee.

MSc ENS Senior Academic Research Tutor

Professor Stephen Fallows

Immediately after graduating (way back in the 1970s) Professor Fallows worked in the Eastern Province of Zambia for a local organisation, Chipata Dzithandizeni Nutrition Group, concerned with nutrition education and other actions to promote nutritional wellbeing of the local people. The work was supported by OXFAM, NOVIB and other organisations.

On his return to the UK he completed a PhD in food and nutrition policy at the University of Bradford.

Following a post-doctoral period at the University of Bradford working on a number of food and nutrition policy projects Professor Fallows made a career shift in the late 1980s and was appointed as manager of the University’s early explorations into computer based education.

In 1992 Professor Fallows moved to the University of Luton as Reader in Educational Development.

In 2001 Professor Fallows made a second career shift and returned to his home discipline of nutrition and joined the Centre for Exercise and Nutrition Science at the University of Chester as Research Co-ordinator.

Within the Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition, Professor Fallows’ teaching focuses on Nutrition & Health and on Research Methods. Professor Fallows manages the research phase of the department’s MSc programmes and is a key source of advice to students on matters such as project design and research ethics.

Professor Fallows is also supervisor for a number of PhD students, including two who are based in Ireland.

MSc ENS Lecturer

Dr. Mike Morris

Dr Mike Morris is Deputy Head of University of Chester’s Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition. Mike has been a member of the Department since September 2005, his specialist areas of teaching are exercise and health and exercise physiology.

Mike’s research interests are in the areas of perceived exertion and physical activity and his qualifications include:

  • Ph. D., University of Liverpool
  • MSc (Distinction), Exercise and Nutrition Science, University of Chester
  • BSc (Hons), Sports Science (Physiology), Liverpool John Moores University
  • FHEA, Fellow of the Higher Education Academy ​

Mike’s specialist areas are Exercise Physiology, Data Analysis and Statistics and he teaches on the following Postgraduate modules:

  • Exercise and Health
  • Physiology and Physical Performance
  • Cardiovascular Anatomy and Exercise Physiology
  • Clinical Exercise Testing, Prescription and Programming
  • Exercise and Weight Management
  • Research Methods and Data Analysis
  • Dissertation
MSc ENS Lecturer

Dr Rehana Jawadwala

Before joining the department as a lecturer in Sports Nutrition, Rehana worked in the commercial fitness industry in India, where she was involved in various nutrition counselling and teaching related activities for over 6 years.

Rehana then joined The Centre for Applied Sport and Exercise Sciences (CASES) at University of Central Lancashire where she taught on a number of undergraduate modules in Sports Science and Exercise, Nutrition and Health degrees along with reading towards a Ph.D. degree. Her research involves studying the effects of calcium supplementation on substrate metabolism in endurance sport.

Rehana is also engaged in various sport science consultancy activities such as nutrition counselling and physiological testing for elite and professional rugby football players, cycling and other long distance sports.

Rehana is actively involved in various public engagement and science communication activities. She was a British Science Association Media Fellow in 2007 working at the Daily Mirror, Science Media Centre and Royal Society press offices. She has been involved in the judging of the British Science Association Perspectives Poster competition in 2008 and the National Science Competition held by the DIUS (BIS) since its inception in 2009.

She is actively involved in the Researcher-in-Residence and the Science and Engineering Ambassador scheme.

Professional Memberships:

  • Higher Education Academy (Fellow)/ SEDA
  • American College of Sports Medicine
  • Nutrition Society
  • British Association of Sport and Exercise Science

Email:[email protected]

Phone:0044 1244 513406

MSc ENS Lecturer

Lizzy Deery

Lizzy is a lecturer in Clinical Exercise Physiology with a particular interest in lifestyle related diseases. Lizzy’s areas of research include the prevention, treatment and management of chronic illness with physical activity and nutrition, and the impact of sedentary behaviours on health. Lizzy is a member of BASES, the BACPR and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA).

Lizzy completed a BSc in Sport & Exercise Science (Exercise Physiology) at Edinburgh Napier University, completing her undergraduate dissertation entitled “investigating the use of submaximal cycle ergometer tests to predict treadmill VO2max” before completing an MSc in Clinical Exercise Physiology at Liverpool John Moores University. There she completed her postgraduate thesis entitled “Systematic Review of the use of CPET in risk stratification of major abdominal surgery patients” under the guidance of Prof. Greg Whyte (LJMU) and Mr Malcolm West (Aintree University Hospital).

Pursuing her interest in reducing lifestyle related illness, Lizzy enjoyed a role as a Health & Wellbeing Physiologist for Nuffield Health prior to assuming her post at University of Chester in 2015. Lizzy is currently completing a PhD investigating occupational sedentary time and cardiometabolic health, as well as pursuing research in occupational exercise testing and the impact of sitting time in clinical populations.

Email:[email protected]

Phone:0044 1244 513406

MSc Programme Leader

Dr. Ceri Nicholas

After completing her PhD on nutritional interventions in high intensity intermittent exercise, Dr. Nicholas began her teaching career as a lecturer in Sports Science at the University of Wales Institute Cardiff. In 1996, she returned to Loughborough University as a Research Fellow in the Department of Physical Education and Sports Science before moving to the University of Essex to take up the post of Teaching Fellow in the Department of Biological Sciences in 2003.

In 2006, Dr Nicholas joined the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences at the University of Chester as a Senior Lecturer and moved to the Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition in 2012. Within the Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition, Dr Nicholas’ teaching focuses on Exercise Physiology and Sports Nutrition.

Dr Nicholas is the progrmme leader and she also manages the research phase of the MSc in Exercise and Nutrition Science programme.

Dr Nicholas is the Department’s disability support, equality and diversity officer and is also a member of the Faculty’s Research Ethics Committee.

MSc ENS Senior Academic Research Tutor

Professor Stephen Fallows

Immediately after graduating (way back in the 1970s) Professor Fallows worked in the Eastern Province of Zambia for a local organisation, Chipata Dzithandizeni Nutrition Group, concerned with nutrition education and other actions to promote nutritional wellbeing of the local people. The work was supported by OXFAM, NOVIB and other organisations.

On his return to the UK he completed a PhD in food and nutrition policy at the University of Bradford.

Following a post-doctoral period at the University of Bradford working on a number of food and nutrition policy projects Professor Fallows made a career shift in the late 1980s and was appointed as manager of the University’s early explorations into computer based education.

In 1992 Professor Fallows moved to the University of Luton as Reader in Educational Development.

In 2001 Professor Fallows made a second career shift and returned to his home discipline of nutrition and joined the Centre for Exercise and Nutrition Science at the University of Chester as Research Co-ordinator.

Within the Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition, Professor Fallows’ teaching focuses on Nutrition & Health and on Research Methods. Professor Fallows manages the research phase of the department’s MSc programmes and is a key source of advice to students on matters such as project design and research ethics.

Professor Fallows is also supervisor for a number of PhD students, including two who are based in Ireland.

MSc ENS Lecturer

Dr. Mike Morris

Dr Mike Morris is Deputy Head of University of Chester’s Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition. Mike has been a member of the Department since September 2005, his specialist areas of teaching are exercise and health and exercise physiology.

Mike’s research interests are in the areas of perceived exertion and physical activity and his qualifications include:

  • Ph. D., University of Liverpool
  • MSc (Distinction), Exercise and Nutrition Science, University of Chester
  • BSc (Hons), Sports Science (Physiology), Liverpool John Moores University
  • FHEA, Fellow of the Higher Education Academy ​

Mike’s specialist areas are Exercise Physiology, Data Analysis and Statistics and he teaches on the following Postgraduate modules:

  • Exercise and Health
  • Physiology and Physical Performance
  • Cardiovascular Anatomy and Exercise Physiology
  • Clinical Exercise Testing, Prescription and Programming
  • Exercise and Weight Management
  • Research Methods and Data Analysis
  • Dissertation
MSc ENS Lecturer

Dr Rehana Jawadwala

Before joining the department as a lecturer in Sports Nutrition, Rehana worked in the commercial fitness industry in India, where she was involved in various nutrition counselling and teaching related activities for over 6 years.

Rehana then joined The Centre for Applied Sport and Exercise Sciences (CASES) at University of Central Lancashire where she taught on a number of undergraduate modules in Sports Science and Exercise, Nutrition and Health degrees along with reading towards a Ph.D. degree. Her research involves studying the effects of calcium supplementation on substrate metabolism in endurance sport.

Rehana is also engaged in various sport science consultancy activities such as nutrition counselling and physiological testing for elite and professional rugby football players, cycling and other long distance sports.

Rehana is actively involved in various public engagement and science communication activities. She was a British Science Association Media Fellow in 2007 working at the Daily Mirror, Science Media Centre and Royal Society press offices. She has been involved in the judging of the British Science Association Perspectives Poster competition in 2008 and the National Science Competition held by the DIUS (BIS) since its inception in 2009.

She is actively involved in the Researcher-in-Residence and the Science and Engineering Ambassador scheme.

Professional Memberships:

  • Higher Education Academy (Fellow)/ SEDA
  • American College of Sports Medicine
  • Nutrition Society
  • British Association of Sport and Exercise Science

Email:[email protected]

Phone:0044 1244 513406

MSc ENS Lecturer

Lizzy Deery

Lizzy is a lecturer in Clinical Exercise Physiology with a particular interest in lifestyle related diseases. Lizzy’s areas of research include the prevention, treatment and management of chronic illness with physical activity and nutrition, and the impact of sedentary behaviours on health. Lizzy is a member of BASES, the BACPR and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA).

Lizzy completed a BSc in Sport & Exercise Science (Exercise Physiology) at Edinburgh Napier University, completing her undergraduate dissertation entitled “investigating the use of submaximal cycle ergometer tests to predict treadmill VO2max” before completing an MSc in Clinical Exercise Physiology at Liverpool John Moores University. There she completed her postgraduate thesis entitled “Systematic Review of the use of CPET in risk stratification of major abdominal surgery patients” under the guidance of Prof. Greg Whyte (LJMU) and Mr Malcolm West (Aintree University Hospital).

Pursuing her interest in reducing lifestyle related illness, Lizzy enjoyed a role as a Health & Wellbeing Physiologist for Nuffield Health prior to assuming her post at University of Chester in 2015. Lizzy is currently completing a PhD investigating occupational sedentary time and cardiometabolic health, as well as pursuing research in occupational exercise testing and the impact of sitting time in clinical populations.

Email:[email protected]

Phone:0044 1244 513406

Frequently Asked Questions

The answers to the most commonly asked questions from prospective students

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